book use

interest in the use of printed books in contemporary culture.....as creative , decorative, and functional objects.
thoughts on ebooks & ereaders, book related text & quotes, typography, textile & paper arts, maps & mapping, and bookstore & library love are all present. oxo.

ps ~ my views on politics, race, class, gender, and education are also very present. if this offends you, please don't follow me.

eterunizu:

lifehackable:

Let’s all help college students get knowledge they deserve for free:)
http://gen.lib.rus.ec
http://textbooknova.com
http://en.bookfi.org/
http://www.gutenberg.org
http://ebookee.org
http://www.manybooks.net
http://www.giuciao.com
http://www.feedurbrain.com
http://oll.libertyfund.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=380
http://www.alleng.ru/ 
http://www.eknigu.com/ 
http://ishare.iask.sina.com.cn/
http://2020ok.com/
http://www.freebookspot.es/Default.aspx
http://www.freeetextbooks.com/
http://onebigtorrent.org/
http://www.downeu.me/ebook/
http://forums.mvgroup.org
http://theaudiobookbay.com/
More Here

wolfinthewater

eterunizu:

lifehackable:

Let’s all help college students get knowledge they deserve for free:)

http://gen.lib.rus.ec

http://textbooknova.com

http://en.bookfi.org/

http://www.gutenberg.org

http://ebookee.org

http://www.manybooks.net

http://www.giuciao.com

http://www.feedurbrain.com

http://oll.libertyfund.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=380

http://www.alleng.ru/ 

http://www.eknigu.com/ 

http://ishare.iask.sina.com.cn/

http://2020ok.com/

http://www.freebookspot.es/Default.aspx

http://www.freeetextbooks.com/

http://onebigtorrent.org/

http://www.downeu.me/ebook/

http://forums.mvgroup.org

http://theaudiobookbay.com/

More Here

wolfinthewater

(via blackfeminism)

cats-and-cardigans:

Fiction:
Babyji by Abha Dawesar
Blue Boy, by Rakesh Satyal
Funny Boy, by Shyam Selvadurai
Ode to Lata, Ghalib Shiraz Dhalla
The Paths of Marriage, by Mala Kumar
The Pregnant King, by Devdutt Pattanaik
Quarantine, by Rahul Mehta
She of the Mountains, by Vivek Shraya
The Two Krishnas, by Ghalib Shiraz Dhalla
The World Unseen, by Shamim Sarif
Non-Fiction & Anthologies:
AIDS Sutra: Untold Stories from India, by Amartya Sen and various authors
Because I Have A Voice: Queer Politics in India, edited by Arvind Narrain and Gautam Bhan
Gay Bombay: Globalization, Love, and (Be)Longing in Contemporary India, by Parmesh Shahani
Impossible Desires: Queer Diasporas and South Asian Public Cultures, by Gayatri Gopinath
The Invisibles, by Zia Jaffrey
A Lotus of Another Color, by Rakesh Ratti
Love’s Rite: Same-Sex Marriage in India and the West by Ruth Vanita
Made in India: Decolonializations, Queer Sexualities, Trans/National Projects, by Suparna Bhaskaran
Same-Sex Love in India, edited by Ruth Vanita and Saleem Kidwal
Sexual Sites, Seminal Attitudes: Sexualities, Masculinities and Culture in South Asia, by Sanjay Srivastava
Shikhandi and Other Tales They Don’t Tell You, by Devdutt Pattanaik
Queer Activism in India: A Story in the Anthropology of Ethics, by Naisargi Dave
Queering India: Same-Sex Love and Eroticism in Indian Culture and Society, by Ruth Vanita
With Respect to Sex: Negotiating Hijra Identity in South India, by Gaytri Reddy

cats-and-cardigans:

Fiction:

Non-Fiction & Anthologies:

(via youarenotdesi)

ultrafacts:

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

Pretty much yea ^

ultrafacts:

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

Pretty much yea ^

nezua:

rollership:

thinksquad wrote: 

A California-based group has distributed and trained some Ferguson residents on how to use body cameras to record police.

Copwatch raised more than $6,000 to purchase 110 of the small devices to give to residents over the weekend, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported (http://bit.ly/1uswQXx).

resistencia

(Source: thinksquad, via trillaryclinton)

teachingliteracy:

An invisible red thread connects those who are destined to meet, regardless of time, place, or circumstances. The thread may stretch or tangle but will never break.

teachingliteracy:

An invisible red thread connects those who are destined to meet, regardless of time, place, or circumstances. The thread may stretch or tangle but will never break.

(Source: ignota-terra)

shrooomieee:

stevemccurrystudios:

"Burma  is one of the poorest countries in Southeast Asia, with decaying infrastructure and an economy that is just now starting to pick up after decades of stagnation. Yet, it boasts one of the highest literacy rates in the region.

The reverence for reading is evident when you visit. In Yangon, bookstores or book- lending shops are prominent on seemingly every street. Street vendors bide their time between customers reading news magazines. Book clubs are popular. Libraries such as the American Center and British Council Library have robust book club programs; a young professional and former medical student I spoke with during my last trip there said he and his friends have been involved in book clubs since their university days.”

- Wendy Rockett,The Asia Foundation

https://stevemccurry.wordpress.com/2014/09/22/language-of-hands/

My grandfather told me that some of my family members are from Burma—and this is so true, they’re all so well-read.

medievalpoc:

nationalpost:

Poor father sells all his land so 13-year-old daughter can enroll in microbiology master’s program in India
In a country where many girls are still discouraged from going to school, Sushma Verma is having anything but a typical childhood.
The 13-year-old girl from a poor family in north India has enrolled in a master’s degree in microbiology, after her father sold his land to pay for some of his daughter’s tuition in the hope of catapulting her into India’s growing middle class.
Verma finished high school at 7 and earned an undergraduate degree at age 13 — milestones she said were possible only with the sacrifices and encouragement of her uneducated and impoverished parents.
“They allowed me to do what I wanted to do,” Verma said in an interview, speaking her native language of Hindi. “I hope that other parents don’t impose their choices on their children.” (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)

It’s my hope that in the future, women of color will be able to forge careers in STEM without the necessity of sacrifices or financial hardship. Sushma Verma’s accomplishments can hopefully light our way forward.

medievalpoc:

nationalpost:

Poor father sells all his land so 13-year-old daughter can enroll in microbiology master’s program in India

In a country where many girls are still discouraged from going to school, Sushma Verma is having anything but a typical childhood.

The 13-year-old girl from a poor family in north India has enrolled in a master’s degree in microbiology, after her father sold his land to pay for some of his daughter’s tuition in the hope of catapulting her into India’s growing middle class.

Verma finished high school at 7 and earned an undergraduate degree at age 13 — milestones she said were possible only with the sacrifices and encouragement of her uneducated and impoverished parents.

“They allowed me to do what I wanted to do,” Verma said in an interview, speaking her native language of Hindi. “I hope that other parents don’t impose their choices on their children.” (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)

It’s my hope that in the future, women of color will be able to forge careers in STEM without the necessity of sacrifices or financial hardship. Sushma Verma’s accomplishments can hopefully light our way forward.

(via yorhorho)

zaynisgayforme:

Decided to include Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche’s feminist message because I feel like it gives a lot to the song. I also included an extra chorus at the end. 

DOWNLOAD

(via alizarin--crimson)